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REGULATORY REFORM (FIRE SAFETY) ORDER 2005

Fire Safety Risk Assessment

Premises
Address
Assessment carried out by
Date of assessment
Responsible Person



Company Name
Address




Use of Premises
Total Size (M Sq)Number of Fire Exit
Date of AssessmentTimes in Use
Responsible PersonCompetent Person
General Description of building
Existing Fire Safety Systems within the premises:
Line monitoring:
Emergency Lighting:
Sprinkler System fitted:
FM200 or similar fitted: How many litres
Ansul / Amerex fitted:How many tanks:
On arrival was FA Panel clear of faults?

Panel in fault
More Zones required Double Pole Isolating Spur Key switch required to BS5839-1-2002
Fire Alarm Log Book: E/Lighting Log Book:
Fire Extinguisher Log Book: Fire Resisting Door Log:
Fire Safety Training: Fire Safety Refresher:
Fire Drill: Bomb Alert Drill:
Annual Workplace Audit: Dangerous Substances: List substance
Fire Fighters Switch: Location:
5 yr Fixed wire test:
Staff/Tenants: Public:
Disabled Visitors: Employees under 18yrs:
Outside contractors: Other:


Assessor: Assessor's signature:
Client: Address:
Date: Review Date:
Existing cover: Customer's signature:
Date of previous FRA:
Supporting Information: The Five Steps to a Risk Assessment Document.
People at Risk:
All 'Significant Findings' are highlighted within the designated areas of the relevant 'Action Plan'



 

Level of Risk

Description

Low

The building is considered to be of a low risk with minimal hazards

Medium

Normal for this type of occupancy

High

The building incorporates a number of serious hazards that are considered to be at an unacceptable level

 

Consequence

Description

Slight Harm

Outbreak of fire unlikely to result in serious injury or death of any occupant

Moderate Harm

Outbreak of fire could result in injury of one or more occupants, but it is unlikely to involve multiple fatalities

Extreme Harm

Significant potential for serious injury or death of one or more occupants.

 

INTRODUCTION AND GUIDANCE

In accordance with The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (England and Wales) and using the category’s listed below a Fire Risk Assessment of your premises should be conducted.
 

  • Section 2:-    Fire Alarm & Emergency Lighting

  • Section 3:-    Assembly Point

  • Section 4:-    Signage

  • Section 5:-    Means of Escape:- Escape Routes, Fire Doors, Fire Resistance, Travel Distance & Miscellaneous

  • Section 6:-    Prevention & Management:- Training, Calling the Fire Service, Fire Drills, Fire Wardens/Marshals, Fire Extinguishing Media

  • Section 7:-    Life Risk:- Housekeeping & Miscellaneous, Consequences to people in the event of a fire

  • Section 8:-    Ignition Source:- Equipment, Heating & Lighting, Smoking, Cooking & Miscellaneous

  • Section 9:-    Combustible Materials:- Substances harmful to health, Acids, Explosives

  • Section 10:- Information for the Fire Service:- Site Information & Hazards to Fire fighters


The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and regulations made under it cover the provision of fire precautions which are intended to prevent the outbreak of a fire or minimise the consequences should one occur. Matters falling within the scope of the Act include the storage of flammable materials, the control of flammable vapours, standards of housekeeping, safe systems of work, the control of sources of ignition and the provision of appropriate training. These precautions are enforced by inspectors from the Health and Safety Executive or the local authority.

The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 requires you to:-

  • Carry out a fire risk assessment of your building (you must consider all of your tenants and other people who may be affected by a fire in the building and you are required to make adequate provision for any disabled people with special needs who use or may be present at your premises);

  • Identify the significant findings of the risk assessment and the details of anyone who might be especially at risk in case of fire (these must be recorded);

  • Provide and maintain such fire precautions as are necessary to safeguard those who use your building; and

  • Provide information, instruction and training to your tenants about the fire precautions in your building.

The risk assessment will help you decide the nature and extent of the general fire precautions which you will need to provide.

Six other legal duties you need to know and comply with are:-

  • Where it is necessary to safeguard the safety of tenants, you must nominate people to undertake any special roles which are required under your emergency plan (you can nominate yourself for this purpose);

  • You must consult your tenants (or elected representatives) about the nomination of people to carry out particular roles in connection with fire safety and about proposals for improving fire precautions;

  • You must inform other tenants who also have rooms in the building of any significant risks you find which might affect the safety of their tenants – and co-operate with them about the measures proposed to reduce/control these risks.

  • If you are not an owner but have any control of premises which contain more than one building, you are responsible for ensuring that the requirements of the Fire Regulations are complied with in those parts you have control over.

  • You must establish a suitable means of contacting the emergency services, and ensure that they can be easily called;

  • The law requires your tenants to co-operate with you to ensure the building is safe from fire and its effects, and do not do anything which will place themselves or other people at risk

Time Scales.
 

It is important therefore that this assessment is not just a paper exercise and it should be read carefully, and any recommended actions taken. Where the client feels that the cost of the recommended improvements outweighs the risk, this should be discussed with the consultant for possible alternative action.

We strongly advise that this risk assessment is reviewed on a regular basis by the ‘Responsible Person’ to keep it up to date, and, in any event, at intervals of no more than 12 months. We have provided a recommended date in section 1. This date assumes that all the ‘Action Plans’ in sections 2-10 have been taken in the time scales set. Should any alteration or actions take place prior to the review date then the assessment should be reviewed immediately. It should be noted that this risk assessment in our opinion is not complete until recommended actions have been implemented fully.

Action points are split into High (H), Medium (M) and Low (L) priority next to the individual hazards with suggested time scales in months 1, 2, or 3.

Any Action stating ‘Immediate’ requires severe steps to be taken urgently to rectify a potentially fatal situation.

Should you require further advice on any section of the assessment, please do not hesitate to contact us.


The Owner and or Responsible Person.
 

The owner, or other responsible person, should ensure that the additional fire safety controls, recommendations and actions set out below are effected to bring the assessed areas up to a standard that will ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the safety of any of his tenants, any other person lawfully on the premises or any person in the immediate vicinity of the premises at risk from a fire on the premises.

Responsible Persons must, amongst other duties, provide their tenants with comprehensive and relevant information on the risks to them identified by the risk assessment, the preventative and protective measures taken and the procedures and measures in place in the event of serious and imminent danger to them.

Where relevant facts in relation to the premises were not visually apparent on the date of our inspection, we have relied upon the information and/or responses provided by or on behalf of the Tenants or other responsible person.

We have assumed that all relevant building regulations were complied with in the construction of the premises, including any extension(s), conversion(s),renovation(s) and refurbishment(s).

Unless otherwise stated, we have assumed that at the premises (i) all fire safety equipment, including fire doors and fire resistant partitions and (ii) all servicing of fire safety equipment has been installed or carried out (as the case may be) by persons competent to do so and in accordance with all applicable standards.

We have not looked in roof spaces or other hidden areas on the premises except where there was an obvious fire hazard which reasonably required further investigation.

We have assumed that information and documentation supplied to us by or on behalf of the Owner or other responsible person who has a bearing on the fire risk assessment is current, true, accurate and not misleading.

The term ‘responsible person’ has the meaning given to it in The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 [and the Fire (Scotland) Act 2005.
 



Fire Alarm

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Do all staff know how to operate the fire alarm?
Do all staff know what the fire alarm sounds like?
Is there a zone plan next to the fire alarm panel?
Is the fire alarm system adequate/sufficient throughout the building(s)?
Is the fire alarm audible throughout the building?
Is the fire alarm tested by operation every week in rotation with records kept?
Is the fire alarm serviced by a qualified engineer in accordance with its design specification and with current legislation, with test records kept?
Do all staff know what they are expected to do if they hear the fire alarm sounding?
Are visitors informed of what they are expected to do if they hear the fire alarm sounding?
Are automatic and/or manual shutdown controls provided to gas or boilers?
Are Fire Curtains installed with up to date maintenance records?
Is Compartmentation in roof voids to BD2846?
Do ceiling or roof voids in excess of 800mm contain adequate detection?
Degraded Fire Alarm system/emergency plan?

Action Plan : Fire Alarm




Emergency Lighting

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Is there adequate light to enable the escape routes to be used safely at all times when the building is occupied, including during winter months, evening, nights and in the event of a power failure?
Is there adequate light to enable the fire precautions to be used safely at all times the building is occupied?
Is the emergency lighting system tested by operation every six months by a designated member of staff?
Degraded Emergency Lighting system/emergency plan?

Action Plan : Emergency Lighting




Assembly Areas

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are the fire assembly points located in a safe place?
Are the routes to the assembly point kept clear and safe?
Are all staff and contractors informed of and know the location of the assembly point?
Are all staff familiar with the location and routes to the fire assembly point?
Are all visitors informed of the location and routes to the assembly point?
Do staff need to cross a road to arrive at the assembly point?

Action Plan : Assembly Areas




Fire Exit Signs

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Do all fire exit signs conform to current British and European standards and display a Running Man? Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals Regulations) 1996.
Can exit signs indicating the way out be seen from all locations within the workplace?
Are exit signs illuminated sufficiently where ambient light levels are low?
Do exit signs include directional arrows where appropriate?

Action Plan : Fire Exit Signs




Fire Action Notices

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are fire action notices displayed next to call points?
Are fire action notices displayed on notice boards in common areas?
Are fire action notices displayed on escape routes?
Do fire action notices include instruction on what to do when discovering a fire?
Do fire action notices include instruction on what to do when hearing the fire alarm?

Action Plan : Fire Action Notices




Escape Routes

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
At the time of inspection do all escape routes, (protected routes, external routes, stairways etc) appear to be satisfactory.
Are all escapes routes provided with lighting to a standard to enable persons to leave safely?
Are very long corridors subdivided into equal parts by doors that are capable of preventing smoke passage?
Do all escape routes lead to a place of safety at least 50m away from the building, where this is not possible not closer than 18mtrs from the building?
Are there combustible materials or other articles in staircase enclosures?
Can all persons escape to a place of safety i.e. clear of the building?
Are all escape routes clear of obstructions?
Are all final exit doors kept unlocked when the premises are in use?

Action Plan : Escape Routes




Means of Escape

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
If at the time of inspection are there any maintenance or building works that are under construction that obstruct or degrade the means of escape from the premises?
Are there provisions made for persons in bed?
Are there lifts and refuge areas for the disabled?
Have PEEPS (Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan) GEEPS (General Emergency Evacuation Plan) assessments been carried out for those with specific difficulties?
Are additional means of escape advisable i.e. emergency ladders, chutes required?

Action Plan : Means of Escape




Fire Doors

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are all doors that are required to be fire resisting, self-closing, free from any unapproved means of holding the door in an open position?
The doors must be signed 'Fire Door Keep Shut' in accordance with British Standard 5499 and the Safety Signs and Signal Regulations 1996?
Are all doors not required to be fire doors (not self-closing) i.e. doors to cupboards etc must be signed Fire Door Keep Locked in accordance with British Standard 5499 and The Safety Signs and Signal Regulations 1996?
Are all fire resisting doors (BS476) and partitions satisfactory and free from damage, wear and tear?
Are all fire door smoke seals in good condition with the gap being no greater than 3.00mm?
Is the function of fire doors covered in staff training?
Are staff instructed to close all doors they pass through during an evacuation?
Are fire wardens aware of the safest method of opening a door during a sweep of their building?
Are all internal and external stairs and landings provided with hand rails and adequately guarded on any open side?
Any mechanical systems provided to assist in the protection in the means of escape (Pressurisation, smoke extraction) are maintained to the appropriate standards?

Action Plan : Fire Doors




Further information regarding Means of Escape:

Roof exits

It may be reasonable for an escape route to cross a roof. Where this is the case, additional precautions will normally be necessary:

• The roof should be flat and the route across it should be adequately defined and well illuminated where necessary, with normal electric and emergency escape lighting.

The route should be non-slip and guarded with a protective barrier.

• The escape route across the roof and its supporting structure should be constructed as a fire-resisting floor.

• Where there are no alternatives other than to use a roof exit, any doors, windows, roof lights and ducting within 3m of the escape route should be fire-resisting.

• The exit from the roof should be in, or lead to, a place of reasonable safety where people can quickly move to a place of total safety.

• Where an escape route passes through or across another person’s property, you will need to have a robust legal agreement in place to allow its use at all times when people are on your premises.

• These should not normally be used by members of the public.

External escape routes should receive routine inspection and maintenance to ensure they remain fit for use. You will need to ensure that any legal agreements in place cover access for maintenance of the escape route.

In multi-occupied premises, escape routes should normally be independent of other occupiers, i.e. people should not have to go through another occupier’s premises as the route may be secured or obstructed

In multi-occupied premises, escape routes should normally be independent of other occupiers, i.e. people should not have to go through another occupier’s premises as the route may be secured or obstructed. Where this is not possible, then robust legal agreements should be in place to ensure their availability at all times.


Suitability of escape routes;

You should ensure that your escape routes are:

• suitable;

• easily, safely and immediately usable at all times;

• adequate for the number of people likely to use them;

• generally usable without passing through doors requiring a key or code to unlock, or with low level manual over-rides for metal roller shutter doors;

• free from any obstructions, slip or trip hazards;

• well lit by normal or emergency escape lighting; and

• available for access by the emergency services.

All doors on escape routes should open in the direction of escape and ideally be fitted with a safety vision panel. This is particularly important if more than 60 people are expected to use them at any one time or they provide an exit from an area of high fire risk.

At least two exits should be provided if a room/area is to be occupied by more than 60 persons.

This number of 60 can be varied in proportion to the risk, for a lower risk there can be a slight increase, for a higher risk, lower numbers of persons should be allowed.

Movement of persons up or down a group of not less than three steps will be so obvious to those following that they will be prepared for the change in level, but movement up or down one step is not so readily observed and may easily lead to a fall.

Wherever practicable, differences of level in corridors, passages and lobbies should be overcome by the provision of inclines or ramps of gradients not exceeding 1 in 12 or steps not having less than three risers in any flight.

Corridors and passages should be level for a distance of 1.5 metres in each direction from any steps. Any mirrors situated in escape routes should be sited so that persons escaping from a fire will not be thrown into confusion by any reflected image of the route they are using, or be misled as to the direction they should take to reach fire exits.

While not normally acceptable, the use of ladders, floor hatches, wall hatches or window exits may be suitable for small numbers of able-bodied, trained staff in exceptional circumstances.


Fire-resisting construction:

The type and age of construction are crucial factors to consider when assessing the adequacy

of the existing escape routes. To ensure the safety of people it may be necessary to protect escape routes from the effects of a fire. In older premises it is possible that the type of construction and materials used may not perform to current fire standards.

Fire escapes

The following guide can be used to determine the general capacities of escape routes:

A width of at least 750mm can accommodate up to:         

• 80 people in higher risk premises;

• 100 people in normal risk premises; or

• 120 people in lower risk premises.

A width of at least 1,050mm can accommodate up to:

• 160 people in higher risk premises;

• 200 people in normal risk premises; or

• 240 people in lower risk premises.

An additional 75mm should be allowed for each additional 15 persons (or part of 15).The minimum width of an escape route should not be less than 750mm (unless it is for use by less than five people in part of your premises) and, where wheelchair users are likely to use it, 900mm.

Also changes of occupancy and refurbishment may have led to:

• cavities and voids being created, allowing the potential for a fire to spread unseen;

• doors and hardware worn by age and movement being less likely to limit the spread of smoke;

• damaged or insufficient cavity barriers in modular construction; and

• breaches in fire compartment walls, floors and ceilings created by the installation of new services, e.g. computer cabling.

Where an escape route needs to be separated from the rest of the premises by fire-resisting construction, e.g. a dead-end corridor or protected stairway then you should ensure the following:

Doors, (including access hatches to cupboards, ducts and vertical shafts linking floors), walls, floors and ceilings protecting escape routes should be capable of resisting the passage of smoke and fire for long enough so that people can escape from the building.

• Where suspended or false ceilings are provided, the fire resistance should extend up to the floor slab level above. For means of escape purposes a 30 minute fire-resisting rating is usually enough.

• Cavity barriers, fire stopping, and dampers

in ducts are appropriately installed.
 



Calling the Fire Service

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are the fire service called immediately the fire alarm is sounded and a fire confirmed?
Is there a specifically designated person responsible for calling the fire service in the event of a fire and is there a designated deputy to cover in their absence?
Where an automatic means of calling the fire service is used, has a person been designated to make a manual call as a back-up in case of malfunction?
Are 6 monthly Fire Evacuation Drills being carried out and recorded

Action Plan : Calling the Fire Service




Fire Drills

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are fire drills conducted, based on the assumption that one of the exits may be unusable due to a fire, prohibiting the use of the exit (different exit for every drill conducted)?

Action Plan : Fire Drills




Fire Wardens / Marshals

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are there the necessary numbers of trained fire wardens who have the responsibility to organise the actions to be taken in the event of a fire?
Are fire wardens provided with a distinctive means of identification (Hi-Viz armband)
Is there a deputy fire warden designated for every fire warden to ensure that the role is covered during absences?
Are fire wardens aware that they should pass on all relevant information regarding missing persons and potential hazards to the fire service?

Action Plan : Fire Wardens / Marshals




Extinguishing Media

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are the correct types of fire extinguishers for the fire hazards present?
Is there sufficient number of fire extinguishers for the fire hazard present?
Are all portable fire appliances maintained and in a satisfactory working order?
Are all fire extinguishers wall mounted or on specified floor stands?
Are routine checks performed to ensure that equipment is not obscured, moved or damaged?

Action Plan : Extinguishing Media




Housekeeping

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Is the premises/workplace kept clean and clear of waste?
Is the premises/workplace regularly cleaned, including light fittings, ducting etc?
Are waste bins emptied regularly, at least daily?
Is waste placed in a safe storage area whilst awaiting disposal?
Are areas around the building kept free of accumulated rubbish or waste?
Are all staircases corridors and exit doors kept clear and free from obstruction combustible materials and storage so they can be used as escape routes at all times?

Action Plan : Housekeeping




Miscellaneous

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are all staff/contractors familiar with their surrounding workplace?
Is Fire Stopping required?

Action Plan : Miscellaneous




Equipment

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Is there evidence of damaged or faulty electrical equipment?
Does all equipment, appliances and machinery receive regular testing and maintenance?
Are maintenance records kept?
Is electrical equipment in use with extension leads?
Are multi point adapters in electrical sockets in use?
Are there other obvious sources of ignition

Action Plan : Equipment




Heating and Lighting

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are there restrictions on the use of unauthorised heaters?
Are combustible materials stored in the area?
If Yes are they stored appropriately?
Are flammable materials clear of lamps and other lighting equipment?

Action Plan : Heating and Lighting




Smoking

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Is smoking permitted on the premises?
Are there defined smoking areas?
Are smoking regulations enforced effectively?
Where smoking is permitted are metal bins and ashtrays provided?
Are bins and ashtrays emptied regularly and appropriately?

Action Plan : Smoking




Cooking and Utility areas

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are cooking facilities provided within apartments?
If cooking equipment is available is the correct fire extinguishing media in place?

Action Plan : Cooking and Utility areas




Combustible Hazards

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are there solid combustibles present i.e. wood, paper, cardboard, fabrics etc?
Are gas cylinders kept or used on the premises?
Are such cylinders stored correctly?
Are flammable liquids kept on the premises?
Are they stored correctly?
Are records kept on site as to the quantity of flammable liquid /cylinders stored?
Are there plastics, foam, and rubber etc including furniture and fixtures and fitting on the site?
Are explosives stored correctly? In accordance with BS5607:1998

Action Plan : Combustible Hazards




Information for the Fire Service

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are details relating to the location and isolation of the mains electrical supply available to the fire service?
Are details relating to the location and isolation of the mains gas supply available to the fire service?
Are details relating to the location and isolation of the heating ventilation/air conditioning available to the fire service?
Are details relating to the location of emergency facilities available to the fire service on their arrival (hydrants, riser inlets etc)?
Is there a plan of the building available to the fire service detailing the location of all the fire precautions, access/egress points, hazards etc?

Action Plan : Information for the Fire Service




Hazards to Fire fighters

YESNON/AAction PlanPriorityTime ScaleAction Plan
Completed
Are there hazardous substances that would be a danger to fire fighters attending an incident?
Are there hazardous processes or machinery that would be a danger to fire-fighters attending an incident?
Are there hazardous features in relation to the structure of the building that would be a danger to fire-fighters attending an incident?

Action Plan : Hazards to Fire fighters





FAQ's on Enforcement & Relevant Notices


There are three relevant notices:

  • Alterations Notices
  • Enforcement Notices
  • Prohibition Notices


 


What are relevant notices?


"Relevant notice" is any notice issued by any enforcing authority which is required by the Environment and Safety Information Act 1988 to be entered into the public register of notices. Under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 there are three relevant notices these are; an enforcement notice, an alterations notice and a prohibition notice.


What is an enforcement notice?


An enforcement notice is a document which is sent to the responsible person from a fire authority stating that the enforcing authority (fire service) is of the opinion that the responsible person or any other person as is applicable has failed to comply with any provision of the Fire Safety Order 2005 or of any regulations made under it.


What is an alterations notice?


An alterations notice is a document which is sent to the responsible person from a fire authority stating that the enforcing authority (the fire and rescue service) is of the opinion that the premises constitute, or may constitute, a risk to relevant persons if a change is made to them or the use to which they are put. The notice must state that the enforcing authority is of the above opinion, and, specify the matters which constitute such a risk. Where a notice has been served the responsible person must notify the enforcing authority of any proposed changes.


What is a prohibition notice?


If the enforcing authority is of the opinion that use of premises involves or will involve a risk to relevant persons so serious that use of the premises ought to be prohibited or restricted, the authority may serve on the responsible person or any other person mentioned in article 5(3) a notice (in this Order referred to as a 'prohibition notice').


Who is a relevant person?


A relevant person means any person (including the responsible person) who is or may be on the premises, and, any person in the immediate vicinity of the premises who is at risk from a fire on the premises.


Who is the responsible person?


In the workplace it would be the employer, if the workplace is to any extent under his/her control. In any other premises, then it would be the person who has control of the premises or the owner (as occupier or otherwise) where a trade, business or other undertaking (for profit or not) is carried on.


If I receive a relevant notice what must I do?


You have 2 options


Comply with Notice – If you fail to comply with the notice you will be in breach of the requirements of the notice and as such under Article 32 (1) (d) have committed an offence under the Fire Safety Order 2005.


Appeal the Notice - This must be done within 21 days from the day on which the notice is served, and made to the magistrates court. (the details of this are provided in the body of the notice).


What happens to the notice when you appeal?


If you appeal an enforcement or alterations notice it will suspend the notice until the appeal has been finally disposed of, or withdrawal of the appeal.


This will provide three possible outcomes:

  • The notice may be cancelled - (the notice is not in force)
  • The notice may be affirmed - (must be complied with)
  • The notice may be affirmed with modifications - (comply with the amended version)


A prohibition notice is different in that on an appeal the notice will remain in force unless the court directs the suspending of the notice. The court may cancel or affirm the notice with the same outcomes as for the enforcement and alterations notice above.


What happens when I get a letter stating that I am under investigation?


Essentially the fire and rescue authority will investigate the information regarding the apparent breaches of fire safety law to determine whether an offence or offences have been committed, if this proves to be the case then the service will gather information to enable a prosecution to be taken against the alleged offender.


What happens if the fire and rescue authority intend to take a prosecution against me?


Following the investigation into the apparent breaches of fire safety law where a decision has been taken to pursue a prosecution against the alleged offender, the fire and rescue authority will, within 5 to 10 days of that decision being made, write to the alleged offender informing him of that decision and that he will receive details in connection with this matter in due course.




Definitions -


The following definitions apply in relation to the various words used within the contents of this Fire Risk Assessment.


Fire Log Books


All information in relation to ‘fire’ e.g. Owners names trained in the use of fire extinguishers, those trained as Fire Marshals, date of service/signature of engineer for fire extinguishers, fire alarm and emergency lighting, copy of fire risk assessment should be kept in the Fire Log Book.





Fire Resisting


The construction of doors, walls, floors and other forms of structure using materials in such a manner that if they were tested in accordance with the guidance given in the relevant part of BS 476, would resist the passage of flame and smoke for at least half an hour or any other time specified in the report.


Self-Closing Device


Apparatus fitted to doors to enable them to close automatically after persons have passed through.  Overhead door closers are preferable to closers fitted between the door frame and the door leaf.  Doors fitted with self-closers must not be provided with any other method of holding the doors in the open position – except an approved electromagnetic ‘hold-open’ device connected into an automatic fire alarm system, which will release the door upon the operation of the Fire Alarm.  In certain circumstances, a battery operated ‘Dorgard’ release may also be fitted.


Intumescent Materials


These are materials which, if subjected to heat, swell to form a barrier against the passage of heat and flame.  Intumescent varnish or paint can cover materials to reduce the surface spread of flame or to upgrade some types of wooden doors to an acceptable standard.  It should be noted that intumescent materials do not prevent the passage of “cold” smoke.


Fire and Cold Smoke Seals


In order to maintain the integrity of fire resisting doors, fire and cold smoke seals are fitted to the edges of the door or to the door frames.  Fire seals consist of an intumescent strip, whilst cold Smoke seals take the form of nylon brush or neoprene blade strips it is common for both types of seals to be incorporated into a single fitting.


 



Fire Stopping or Stopped


Terms used to describe the in-filling of voids, passages or small holes with fire resisting materials.  Larger voids when it is necessary to change cables or pipe work regularly, could be filled with intumescent pillows (illustrated).  Small holes, often formed when pipe work and cabling are installed, can be in-filled with intumescent mastic to provide a satisfactory standard.


Emergency Fastenings


Fastenings fitted to doors used as emergency exists and which provide an element of security.  The most common forms are panic bolts and panic latches.  These are usually found on doors leading to open air and where their use would be by large numbers of people or where people are not familiar with the layout of the building.


 


 


Emergency bolts and fastenings


It is generally considered that their installation is only suitable where the persons likely to use them can be given regular fire instruction.  Advice should be sought before installing such fastenings.  All emergency fastenings must be clearly marked as to the method of their operation.


 


Emergency bolt with door alarm


These may be acceptable under certain conditions, such as less than 10 employees. In daytime occupancy or 10 full time residents in sheltered housing. The alarm would reduce the risk of unauthorized access.


 


Locks and Fastenings


All doors through which persons may have to pass to evacuate the building should only be fastened so that they can be easily and immediately opened by one easy method without the use of a key (e.g. Panic bolt or latch and thumb turns where there are small numbers of people).



Fire resisting self-closing doors should not be fitted with cabin hooks.


 


Emergency Lighting


A system of lighting designed to operate in the event of a failure of the mains lighting system.  Such lighting should be wired in a manner that it would operate in the event of a failure of a local lighting circuit.  Its design, construction and maintenance should be in accordance with the guidance given in the relevant parts of British Standard BS 5266, or its European equivalent.  The system must be regularly tested and maintained, with records kept in a Fire Safety Log Book.


 


 


Fire Alarm System


A fire alarm system is a means for giving warning in case of fire.  It is activated by means of manual call points (illustrated) or automatic detection and is provided with sounders of sufficient number and audibility to enable the warning to be heard throughout the building.  Such systems should be designed, constructed, installed and maintained in accordance with the latest editions of the relevant parts of British Standard BS5839 or its European equivalent.  The system must be regularly tested and maintained, with records kept in a Fire Safety Log Book.



Exit Sign


A sign stating “Exit”, “Emergency Exit” or “Fire Exit”, in white lettering on a green background.  Lettering on the notices should be of an adequate size.  Each sign to be provided with the appropriate graphic pictogram symbol as described in British Standard BS 5499 or its European equivalent (e.g. the ‘running man type symbol) along with directional arrow where appropriate.


Fire Instruction/Action Notice


A fire instruction or action notice describes the action to be taken in the event of a fire.  Lettering on the notice should be white in colour on a blue background and should incorporate a blue circle.  In hotel properties, the notice should include a simple floor layout plan placed on the back of the room entrance door.  Any written instructions should ideally be in at least 3 languages.


 


 


Keep Locked Shut Notice


A notice stating “Keep Locked Shut” is fitted to the outside of fire resisting doors which are not provided with self-closing devices.  Usually found on doors to cupboards or areas containing plant and building services.  Lettering on these notices should be white in colour on a blue, circular background and be at least 5mm in height.


 



Fire Exit-Keep Clear Notice


A notice usually found on the outside of exit doors to warn people not to obstruct the exit with storage, transport etc.  Lettering on the notice should be at least 40mm in height, white in colour on a blue background or have a blue circle incorporated in its design


Fire Door-Keep Shut Notice


Self-closing fire resisting doors should have a notice fitted at eye level on both sides of the door station Fire Door – Keep Shut.  The lettering on these notices should be at least 5mm in height and be white in colour on a blue, circular background.


 


 


“Automatic Fire Door-Keep Clear” Notice


Where the door is fitted with electromagnetic releases or a ‘Door guard’ release, a sign stating “Automatic Fire Door – Keep Clear” should be fitted.


 


 


Assembly Point Sign


A sign located in the open air where persons escaping the building can assemble in order that a roll call can be taken.


 


 


Sign and Notices – British Standards


All notices should be designed and printed in accordance with the guidance given in British Standard BS 5499 “Fire Safety Signs, Notices and Graphic Symbols: - Part 1.  Part 3 gives the specification for internally illuminated fire safety signs.  The Safety Signs and Signals Regulation 1996 now require the provision of ‘flame-symbol’ signs to be sited to denote each fire alarm call point, the location of extinguishers, hose reels, fire assembly points etc.


Note:  All notices and signs should be constructed in good quality materials.  “Home made” signs should not be used unless a sign has been damaged or removed and a replacement has been ordered.  The use of ‘photo luminescent’ signs is recommended.


 


Means of Escape


Should be kept clear and available at all times when the premises are occupied and be kept free from ALL obstructions and combustible material.  They should be properly maintained and all Fire Doors onto means of escape should be kept closed when not in use.  Emergency EXIT doors should ideally open in the direction of escape.


Electrically Operated Doors


All doors fitted with electrically operated door release mechanisms should release to the ‘open’ position in the event of a power failure.  They should also release automatically in the event of the fire alarm sounding.  They should also be fitted with ‘break-glass’ (or switched) release points on the side from which escape is required.


Portable First-Aid Fire Fighting Equipment


A workplace should be provided with appropriate first-aid fire-fighting equipment, which should be kept available for use at all times and be properly maintained in compliance with the latest Code of Practice.  They must not be hidden from view.  Pictogram type signs should be provided.




 



Fire Precautions Records and Fire Emergency Plans


All fire precautions records and Fire Emergency Plan should be kept up to date, and also be available for inspection by any authorized person.  The Fire Emergency Plan should be in a written format and include:


The action to be taken upon discovering a fire


What to do if the fire alarm sounds


Responsibility for calling the Fire Brigade


Evacuation of the Building – including those particularly at risk


Power & Process isolation


Assembly Points outside the building(s)


Liaison with Emergency Services


Use of Fire EXIT and escape routes


Correct use of all Fire Fighting Equipment


Responsibilities and duties in case of fire including Fire Marshals


Any training necessary to establish the above


 


Fire Training All tenants and contractors employed to work in the premises should be trained in the Fire Procedure, and up to date records of the training be kept.  Tenantss should nominate and provide training to tenants (as Fire Wardens or Fire Marshals) to assist in implementing the fire safety measures as may be required for the site.


Disabled Persons Procedures for disabled persons should be in place, where appropriate a PEEPS (Personal Emergency Evacuation Procedure) risk assessment should be carried out and implemented and special arrangements made for their safety as appropriate.  In appropriate cases use of an EVAC chair should be considered.



FIRE EMERGENCY PLAN


Action on discovering fire-Any person discovering a fire should:

  • Raise the alarm.

  • Dial 999 to call the Fire Brigade.

  • Attack the fire, if it is safe to do so, using the correct appliances provided.

  • Leave building by nearest available exit.

  • Report to designated assembly point.

  • Activate all shut down valves, switches etc. For example ensure gas cut off.


 Action on hearing the fire alarm-Any person hearing the alarm should:

  • Leave building by nearest available exit.

  • Report to designated assembly point.


 
DO NOT RETURN TO THE BUILDING UNTIL AUTHORISED TO DO SO



Liaison with Emergency Services-On arrival of the Emergency Services, staff will ensure that they make contact with the Officer in Charge and provide a situation report.


This report is to include the following points;

  • Has a full evacuation been completed (if known)?

  • Location and type of fire (if known)?

  • Potential hazards in the building which could affect fire fighting operations.

  • Location of fire alarm panel and electric/gas isolation points within the building.


Staff are to be advised of their responsibilities regarding fire safety and to ensure that their actions do not adversely affect the safety of others within the premises. Staff should be familiar with;

  • Escape routes and fire exits used to evacuate the building.

  • Keeping escape routes clear and unobstructed at all times, (this is to include the physical opening of all final exit doors, to ensure ease of operation).

  • Self-closing fire doors and the need to ensure that they are kept closed at all times.

  • Fire doors on cupboards/storerooms to be kept locked at all times, when not in use.

  • How to manually operate the fire alarm system in an emergency. (The use and location of the red box call points within the building).

  • The location of each fire extinguisher and the types of fire they can be safely used on.

  • Location of designated assembly point outside the building.





Section
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Section Fire Alarm
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Section Emergency Lighting
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Section Assembly Areas
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Section Fire Exit Signs
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Section Fire Action Notices
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Section Escape Routes
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Section Means of Escape
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Section Fire Doors
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Section Calling the Fire Service
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Section Fire Drills
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Section Fire Wardens < Marshals
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Section Extinguishing Media
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Section Housekeeping
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Section Miscellaneous
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Section Equipment
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Section Heating and Lighting
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Section Smoking
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Section Cooking and Utility areas
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Section Combustible Hazards
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Section Information for the Fire Service
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